Adult Hip Fractures | Trauma
Intertrochanteric

Stable Intertrochanteric Fracture
Stable Intertrochanteric Fracture

Definition

  • fractures from the extracapsular part of the neck to a point 5 cm distal to the lesser trochanter

Incidence

Aetiology

Anatomy

Classification

Boyd and Griffin Classification of Intertrochanteric Fractures

Boyd and Griffin Classification of Intertrochanteric Fractures
Type Description
1 Simple fracture that extend along the intertrochanteric line from the greater to the lesser trochanter
2 Comminuted fractures, the main fracture being along the intertrochanteric line, but with multiple fractures in the cortex
3 Fractures that are basically subtrochanteric with at least one fracture passing across the proximal end of the shaft just distal to or at the lesser trochanter. Varying degrees of comminution are associated. (reverse subtrochanteric)
4 Fractures of the trochanteric region and the proximal shaft, with fracture in at least two planes, one of which usually is the sagittal plane and may be difficult to see on routine anteroposterior radiographs

Evans classification of intertrochanteric fractures based on direction of fracture

Evans classification of intertrochanteric fractures based on direction of fracture
Type Description
I

Fracture line extends upward and outward from the lesser trochanter

  • Further subdivided
    • Stable
    • Unstable
      • Stability restored by anatomical reduction
      • Stability unrestored by anatomical reduction
II reverse obliquity fracture, the major fracture line extends outward and downward from the lesser trochanter

AO Classification of Trochanteric Fractures

AO Classification of Trochanteric Fractures
Group Description
A1 uncomminuted
A2 increasing comminution
A3 subtrochanteric extensions or reverse obliquity

 

Pathology

History

Examination

Investigations

Xrays

Treatment

Nonoperative

Broken Gamma Nail
Broken Gamma Nail

Operative

Complications

Prognosis

 

 

 

Return to top